globetrotters

Mike Centioli

3/31  Harlem Globetrotters

Why: In the mood for some basketball, minus the March Madness drama? Head to the Dunkin’ Donuts Center to see your favorite basketball team, the Harlem Globetrotters, face the newly revamped Washington Generals team — and the players won’t be dunking doughnuts! See a dazzling display of basketball wizardry (jumps, tricks, you name it) with a dash of comedy for an event that will be a slam dunk for the whole family.
Where: Dunkin’ Donuts Center, 1 LaSalle Sq., Providence.
More info: Call 331-0700 or visit dunkindonutscenter.com.

Mar
11
Sun
Valley Talks: The Assassination of Lincoln @ Museum of Work & Culture
Mar 11 @ 1:30 pm
Valley Talks: The Assassination of Lincoln @ Museum of Work & Culture | Woonsocket | Rhode Island | United States

The Museum of Work & Culture will offer the final installment of its free Valley Talks series on Sunday, March 11, at 1:30pm.

Writer and historical reenactor Paul Bourget will present “Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?” a talk exploring the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln was in an extraordinary good mood on Good Friday, April 14, 1865. Five days before, Gen. Robert E. Lee had surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to Gen. U.S. Grant at Appomattox, VA. Knowing that the President loved the theater, the First Lady suggested that they attend the outrageously funny comedy playing at Ford’s Theater, Our American Cousin, starring the renowned actress Laura Keene. During the performance, John Wilkes Booth slipped into the President’s box and fatally shot Abraham Lincoln. While the President lay dying across the Street, over 10,000 Federal soldiers, militia, and security agents embarked on the largest manhunt Washington City had ever seen. Booth and his co-conspirators knew that they had to flee to Richmond…but time was running out.

Seating is limited to 75 and is first-come, first-served.

Bourget is the owner and president of Bourget & Associates. He was the editor, researcher, and co-writer of Towers of Faith and Family, a history of Woonsocket’s St. Ann’s parish, and was the founding president of St. Ann Arts and Cultural Center. He currently serves as the President of the Museum of Work & Culture’s Preservation Foundation, Treasurer of the Stadium Theatre Preservation Foundation, and a member of the Woonsocket School Committee. Bourget is also an experienced historical reenactor, portraying Brigadier General George Sears Greene, a native Rhode Islander and forgotten hero of Gettysburg.

Mar
19
Mon
School of Fish @ Hope & Main
Mar 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
School of Fish @ Hope & Main | Warren | Rhode Island | United States

At Eating with the Ecosystem’s “School of Fish”, Rhode Island chefs will educate you on different methods for turning whole local seafood – straight from the sea – into a marvelous dinner you can share with your family and friends. Learn how to use plentiful local species like scup, skate, squid, Jonah crab, whiting, whole sea scallops, dogfish, sea robin, and fluke. Held in the demo kitchen (a former school classroom) at Hope & Main, each workshop is also a dinner, complete with wine and good company! Each workshop will feature one fish species, prepared several ways. Come for just one class or attend them all!

Location: Hope & Main Demonstration Kitchen, 691 Main St. Warren, RI 02885

Ticket price: $50

Available at: https://makefoodyourbusiness.org/cooking-classes-ri/ or http://eatingwiththeecosystem.org/school-of-fish

Apr
5
Thu
8 Bells Lecture:U-boat Assault on America, by Ken Brown @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport
Apr 5 @ 12:00 pm
8 Bells Lecture:U-boat Assault on America, by Ken Brown @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

“U-boat Assault on America: The Eastern Seaboard Campaign 1942,” by Ken Brown.
The “Second Happy Time” was the informal name given to the phase of the battle of the Atlantic when German U-boats attacked both merchant and U.S. naval vessels along America’s east coast. With tankers burning and petrol rationing in New York City, the U.S. Navy seemed powerless to stop the deprivations of Hitler’s marauding U-boats.
Ken Brown seeks to explain how the United States responded to these deadly assaults and looks at the steps that the Navy Department took to train the men, harness the scientists, and make the organizational changes that were required to defeat the German threat.
Ken Brown has had a long fascination with naval history and has been conducting research on U-boats off the east coast of the United States for more than three years. He has published several articles in World at War magazine.

NO RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Apr
7
Sat
Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England at Linden Place Mansion @ Linden Place Mansion
Apr 7 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England at Linden Place Mansion @ Linden Place Mansion | Bristol | Rhode Island | United States

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. This cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops.
Get the taste and feel for Historic New England as author, Corin Hirsch, explores the origins and tastes of the favorite beverages of early Americans. Hirsch takes you back in time to learn about multiple drinks of historic New England with a tasting, lecture, and book singing on Saturday April 7th, 5:30 p.m.

Corin, author of the book Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England, has worked as a food and drinks journalist at various New England publications, including “Seven Days” in Burlington, Vt. Her writing has been published or cited on “Public Radio International,” “Serious Eats,” “the Associated Press,” and “Yankee,” as well as in various newspapers, radio stations, and podcasts.

Apr
16
Mon
School of Fish @ Hope & Main
Apr 16 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
School of Fish @ Hope & Main | Warren | Rhode Island | United States

At Eating with the Ecosystem’s “School of Fish”, Rhode Island chefs will educate you on different methods for turning whole local seafood – straight from the sea – into a marvelous dinner you can share with your family and friends. Learn how to use plentiful local species like scup, skate, squid, Jonah crab, whiting, whole sea scallops, dogfish, sea robin, and fluke. Held in the demo kitchen (a former school classroom) at Hope & Main, each workshop is also a dinner, complete with wine and good company! Each workshop will feature one fish species, prepared several ways. Come for just one class or attend them all!

Location: Hope & Main Demonstration Kitchen, 691 Main St. Warren, RI 02885

Ticket price: $50

Available at: https://makefoodyourbusiness.org/cooking-classes-ri/ or http://eatingwiththeecosystem.org/school-of-fish

May
3
Thu
8 Bells Lecture: Brothers at Arms, by Larrie D. Ferreiro @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport
May 3 @ 12:00 pm
8 Bells Lecture: Brothers at Arms, by Larrie D. Ferreiro @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It,” by Larrie D. Ferreiro.
The remarkable untold story of how the American Revolution’s success depended on substantial military assistance provided by France and Spain, and places the Revolution in the context of the global strategic interests of those nations in their fight against England.
In this groundbreaking, revisionist history, Larrie Ferreiro shows that at the time the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord the colonists had little chance, if any, of militarily defeating the British. The nascent American nation had no navy, little in the way of artillery, and a militia bereft even of gunpowder. In his detailed accounts Ferreiro shows that without the extensive military and financial support of the French and Spanish, the American cause would never have succeeded. France and Spain provided close to the equivalent of $30 billion and 90 percent of all guns used by the Americans, and they sent soldiers and sailors by the thousands to fight and die alongside the Americans, as well as around the world.
Pulitzer Prize Finalist in History and the winner of the Journal of the American Revolution 2016 Book of the Year Award
Larrie D. Ferreiro received his PhD in the History of Science and Technology from Imperial College London. He teaches history and engineering at George Mason University in Virginia and the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. He has served for over thirty-five years in the US Navy, US Coast Guard and Department of Defense, and was an exchange engineer in the French Navy. He is the author of Measure of the Earth: The Enlightenment Expedition That Reshaped Our World and Ships and Science: The Birth of Naval Architecture in the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1800.

NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Undressing History: Women’s Clothes and Unmentionables from the 19th Century @ Newport Historical Society
May 3 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Undressing History: Women’s Clothes and Unmentionables from the 19th Century @ Newport Historical Society

Undressing History: Women’s Clothes & Unmentionables from the 19th Century

A History Space Talk Presented by

the Newport Historical Society & the Rhode Island Historical Society

The Newport Historical Society and the Rhode Island Historical Society are pleased to partner for their first 2018 joint History Space talk when they present Undressing History: Women’s Clothes & Unmentionables from the 19th Century. During this program, which will be offered in Providence and again in Newport, historical costumer Carrie Midura will share some of the secrets (and stuffing) that were hidden beneath the leg-o-mutton sleeves and shelf-like bustle gowns of the 19th century.

Using a combination of meticulously created period reproductions and original garments from her private collection, Carrie will walk visitors through the process of getting dressed during very different decades of the 1800s. This interactive presentation features the undergarments that supported and shaped the fashionable female form when styles and silhouettes were changing as quickly as the New England weather. The program closes with the opportunity to touch and examine these unmentionables that were once commonly found in every lady’s wardrobe.

Carrie Midura has been sewing professionally and as hobby for 25+ years and has taught sewing classes throughout New England. She has been researching and reproducing historic costume since 1992, with a primary focus on eighteenth and early nineteenth century methods and styles since 1999. Her clients included Revolutionary War reenactors, staff and volunteers at the Concord Museum, the historic Massachusetts estate Gore Place, and Adams National Historical Park. Carrie places a great deal of importance on period construction techniques and close attention to detail. Today, she is the Wardrobe Supervisor for the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum where she is passionate about sewing clothing to help costumed interpreters tell the important story of the 1773 event while teaching others to do the same.

Undressing History: Women’s Clothes & Unmentionables from the 19th Century takes place on the following dates:
•Providence, RI: Tuesday, March 6, 2018· p.m. at the Rhode Island Historical Society’s Aldrich House, 110 Benevolent Street, Providence, RI. Free and open to the public. Space is limited, please RSVP https://tinyurl.com/y7s6txls or call 401-331-8575 x360.
•Newport, RI: Thursday May 3, 2018 at 5:30pm at the Newport Historical Society Resource Center, 82 Touro Street, Newport, RI. General admission costs $5 per person and $1 for NHS members along with active duty military. Space is limited, please RSVP below or call 401-841-8770.

This program is generously sponsored by the Harborside Inn. http://www.newportharborsideinn.com/

May
21
Mon
School of Fish @ Hope & Main
May 21 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
School of Fish @ Hope & Main | Warren | Rhode Island | United States

At Eating with the Ecosystem’s “School of Fish”, Rhode Island chefs will educate you on different methods for turning whole local seafood – straight from the sea – into a marvelous dinner you can share with your family and friends. Learn how to use plentiful local species like scup, skate, squid, Jonah crab, whiting, whole sea scallops, dogfish, sea robin, and fluke. Held in the demo kitchen (a former school classroom) at Hope & Main, each workshop is also a dinner, complete with wine and good company! Each workshop will feature one fish species, prepared several ways. Come for just one class or attend them all!

Location: Hope & Main Demonstration Kitchen, 691 Main St. Warren, RI 02885

Ticket price: $50

Available at: https://makefoodyourbusiness.org/cooking-classes-ri/ or http://eatingwiththeecosystem.org/school-of-fish

May
29
Tue
Roland Comtois, Medium: Validating the After Life – Purple Papers @ Courthouse Center for the Arts
May 29 @ 7:00 pm – May 30 @ 9:00 pm

A nationally acclaimed inspirational speaker, spiritual medium, author, and radio host, Roland Comtois is a professional healer and spiritual medium with over thirty years of experience as a gerontology nurse, Reiki Master, metaphysical teacher and grief specialist.

Jun
7
Thu
8 Bells Lecture: “Finding a Pirate Ship,” by Bob Cembrola @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport
Jun 7 @ 12:00 pm
8 Bells Lecture: “Finding a Pirate Ship,” by Bob Cembrola @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

“Finding a Pirate Ship” is the story of the first documented pirate vessel ever discovered. In April of 1717 “Black Sam Bellamy” and his multiracial crew on two vessels, sank in a violent storm on Cape Cod. This set off a mad rush of locals combing the beach for treasure as well as government sanctioned attempts to recover some of the ill-gotten gains known to be on the Whydah.
In 1982, Barry Clifford, a Cape Cod diver and salvor was granted a permit from the state of Massachusetts to search for the remains of the Whydah. What ensued was a modern day undersea gold rush with competing groups seeking the elusive pirate treasure with only Clifford thus far actually finding remains of Bellamy’s flagship.

The on-going excavation has resulted in the recovery of hundreds of thousands of artifacts and revealed what pirate life was actually like versus the romantic Hollywood version too often portrayed. The program will depict the early years of the search when it seemed the treasure would forever remain buried under the shifting sands to the elation of the eventual discovery.
Bob Cembrola is the exhibits manager at the Naval War College Museum and has been diving since 1972. His first shipwreck experience was as a URI undergraduate on HMS Orpheus scuttled in Narragansett Bay in 1778. Since then he has been involved in numerous underwater archaeological projects including the sunken city of Port Royal Jamaica 1692 and HMS Republic 1909.
From 1984 to 1989, he was Executive Director of the Marine Museum at Fall River, Mass. He worked with Woods Hole scientists prior to and after their discovery of the Titanic offering the use of a 28 foot long model of the ill-fated vessel and an interview with a local survivor of the sinking. Bob did his undergraduate studies in history and anthropology at URI and his graduate studies in archaeology at Boston University and anthropology/archaeology at Brown. He has taught an elective at the Naval War College numerous times: “Shipwrecks and Naval History.”

NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC