globetrotters

Mike Centioli

3/31  Harlem Globetrotters

Why: In the mood for some basketball, minus the March Madness drama? Head to the Dunkin’ Donuts Center to see your favorite basketball team, the Harlem Globetrotters, face the newly revamped Washington Generals team — and the players won’t be dunking doughnuts! See a dazzling display of basketball wizardry (jumps, tricks, you name it) with a dash of comedy for an event that will be a slam dunk for the whole family.
Where: Dunkin’ Donuts Center, 1 LaSalle Sq., Providence.
More info: Call 331-0700 or visit dunkindonutscenter.com.

Feb
25
Sun
Valley Talks: Origins of the Right to Work @ Museum of Work & Culture
Feb 25 @ 1:30 pm
Valley Talks: Origins of the Right to Work @ Museum of Work & Culture | Woonsocket | Rhode Island | United States

The Museum of Work and Culture will offer the fourth installment of its free Valley Talks series on Sunday, Feb. 25, at 1:30 p.m.

Writer & professor Cedric de Leon will present “The Origins of the Right to Work,” which explores the the creation of right-to-work laws, and traces their origins to the Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War. In doing so, de Leon connects past and present, raising critical questions that address pressing social issues.

de Leon is Associate Professor of Sociology at Tufts University. He has written three books, including most recently, “The Origins of Right to Work: Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago.” In a past life, he was by turns an organizer and a local union president in the U.S. labor movement. He lives in Providence with his wife Emily, his son Ellis, and his poodle Atticus Finch.

Seating is limited to 75 and is first-come, first-served.

Feb
26
Mon
Finding Phebe: Uncovering the History of Slavery in Warren, Rhode Island @ East Providence Public Library / Weaver
Feb 26 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Finding Phebe: Uncovering the History of Slavery in Warren, Rhode Island @ East Providence Public Library / Weaver | East Providence | Rhode Island | United States

Although 18th century Warren, RI was surrounded by the slave centers of Newport, Bristol and Providence, its small size has made it a footnote in what has been written about slavery and the slave trade. Building on the work of historians, Patricia Mues and Sarah Weed use primary sources – including wills, inventories, town meeting records, censuses and other documents – to identify the enslaved of Warren and learn their histories. Mues and Weed are co-chairs of the Warren Middle Passage Project and board members of the Warren Preservation Society.

Feb
27
Tue
Thrive Cinema: The Human Experiment @ Thrive Tribe RI
Feb 27 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Thrive Cinema: The Human Experiment @ Thrive Tribe RI | East Providence | Rhode Island | United States

Connect with the tribe, watch and learn in a community based setting. A short discussion will take place after the film to share takeaways and any AHA! moments. Bring a blanket, pillow, and a friend 🙂

Friendly conversation with light refreshments.

Cost: $5

About the featured film: “The Human Experiment lifts the veil on the shocking reality that thousands of untested, unregulated chemicals are in the products we use every day, our homes, and inside each of us. Simultaneously, disease rates are rising: everything from cancer to infertility is appearing at levels doctors and researchers have never seen.”

Mar
3
Sat
Design, Discover and Decode: Creating a Resilient Garden – 2018 Garden Symposium @ Center for Biotechnology and Life Sciences
Mar 3 @ 8:30 am – 4:00 pm
Design, Discover and Decode: Creating a Resilient Garden – 2018 Garden Symposium @ Center for Biotechnology and Life Sciences  | South Kingstown | Rhode Island | United States

Already thinking about spring? Now is the time to get Early Bird ticket pricing for the URI Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardener Program, 2018 Spring Gardening Symposium – “DESIGN, DISCOVER and DECODE: Creating a Resilient Garden.”

This delightful one-day symposium is for those who want to learn more about creating beautiful and environmentally–sound gardens.

Educating and entertaining their audiences, these three keynote speakers are accomplished specialists in their fields possessing a wealth of knowledge and expertise.

C. Colston Burrell – Design Resilient Gardens – “Beauty, Integrity, Resilience: Can a Garden Have Everything?”

Linda A. Fleming – Discover Gardening with Herbs – “Bloom Where you Planted”

Jeff Gillman – Decode Garden Myths – “The Truth About Garden Remedies”

Please join us on Saturday, March 3, 2018 at the Center for Biotechnology and Life Sciences on URI’s Kingston Campus. The facility is accessible to all and the symposium is open to everyone.

Early Bird Tickets are $65 if purchased before February 9th.

After February 9, tickets are $75.

For more information or to register, please log-on to: uri.edu/coopext or call 401-874-2900.

A limited number of full scholarships for the Symposium are available. Deadline for scholarships is February 9, 2018.

The mission of the URI Master Gardener Program and it’s 600+ volunteer Extension educators is to educate citizens in environmentally-sound horticulture practices through the dissemination of factual, research-based information.

Mar
4
Sun
Usui Reiki I Training (1st Degree) @ Thrive Tribe RI
Mar 4 @ 9:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Usui Reiki I Training (1st Degree) @ Thrive Tribe RI | East Providence | Rhode Island | United States

This is the beginner Usui Reiki Level I class. You will Learn about Universal Life Force Energy, the history of Reiki, hand positions for treating yourself & others and will practice giving and receiving Reiki. You will also receive the Reiki I Attunement to help increase the flow of this universal life force energy. Training includes a Usui Reiki I Manual and Certificate of Completion. Classes are always fun, educational, and interactive. Register Here: http://gladysellen.com/reiki.html

Mar
8
Thu
Hidden Presence: God’s Little Acre and Beyond @ Newport Historical Society
Mar 8 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Hidden Presence: God’s Little Acre and Beyond @ Newport Historical Society  | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

Evidence of the history of African Americans in New England from the 18th and 19th centuries is found in many historic burial grounds and cemeteries in the region, with the most significant and extensive of these sites being God’s Little Acre in Newport.

On Thursday March 8, 2018, at 5:30pm, historian and author Glenn Knoblock will discuss some of these historic sites, including the burying ground in Newport. Important clues which help to document the lives of African Americans in the region are revealed through these oft-times forgotten or neglected sites and the gravestones found within.  Such burial sites and gravestones are often the only physical evidence of an African American presence and the existence of slavery in a given locale, making them historically important beyond their original function and purpose. The presentation will be richly illustrated with photographs of many important gravestones found in Newport and beyond, and is based on Knoblock’s book “African American Historic Burial Grounds and Gravesites of New England (McFarland Publishing, 2016), which will be available for purchase after the event.

Knoblock has worked as an independent scholar and author with an interest in many aspects of American and, specifically, New Hampshire and African American history, lecturing extensively throughout New Hampshire via the New Hampshire Humanities To Go program. He has an over five-year long collaboration with Harvard’s African American National Biography Project (AANB), for which he suggested and wrote over 100 entries in many different areas, serving as their main military contributor.

“God’s Little Acre and Beyond” takes place at the NHS Resource Center, 82 Touro Street, Newport, RI, and costs $5 per person, $1 for NHS members, active and retired military with ID. Please RSVP online at NewportHistory.org or call 401-841-8770.

Mar
11
Sun
Valley Talks: The Assassination of Lincoln @ Museum of Work & Culture
Mar 11 @ 1:30 pm
Valley Talks: The Assassination of Lincoln @ Museum of Work & Culture | Woonsocket | Rhode Island | United States

The Museum of Work & Culture will offer the final installment of its free Valley Talks series on Sunday, March 11, at 1:30pm.

Writer and historical reenactor Paul Bourget will present “Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?” a talk exploring the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln was in an extraordinary good mood on Good Friday, April 14, 1865. Five days before, Gen. Robert E. Lee had surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to Gen. U.S. Grant at Appomattox, VA. Knowing that the President loved the theater, the First Lady suggested that they attend the outrageously funny comedy playing at Ford’s Theater, Our American Cousin, starring the renowned actress Laura Keene. During the performance, John Wilkes Booth slipped into the President’s box and fatally shot Abraham Lincoln. While the President lay dying across the Street, over 10,000 Federal soldiers, militia, and security agents embarked on the largest manhunt Washington City had ever seen. Booth and his co-conspirators knew that they had to flee to Richmond…but time was running out.

Seating is limited to 75 and is first-come, first-served.

Bourget is the owner and president of Bourget & Associates. He was the editor, researcher, and co-writer of Towers of Faith and Family, a history of Woonsocket’s St. Ann’s parish, and was the founding president of St. Ann Arts and Cultural Center. He currently serves as the President of the Museum of Work & Culture’s Preservation Foundation, Treasurer of the Stadium Theatre Preservation Foundation, and a member of the Woonsocket School Committee. Bourget is also an experienced historical reenactor, portraying Brigadier General George Sears Greene, a native Rhode Islander and forgotten hero of Gettysburg.

Mar
19
Mon
School of Fish @ Hope & Main
Mar 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
School of Fish @ Hope & Main | Warren | Rhode Island | United States

At Eating with the Ecosystem’s “School of Fish”, Rhode Island chefs will educate you on different methods for turning whole local seafood – straight from the sea – into a marvelous dinner you can share with your family and friends. Learn how to use plentiful local species like scup, skate, squid, Jonah crab, whiting, whole sea scallops, dogfish, sea robin, and fluke. Held in the demo kitchen (a former school classroom) at Hope & Main, each workshop is also a dinner, complete with wine and good company! Each workshop will feature one fish species, prepared several ways. Come for just one class or attend them all!

Location: Hope & Main Demonstration Kitchen, 691 Main St. Warren, RI 02885

Ticket price: $50

Available at: https://makefoodyourbusiness.org/cooking-classes-ri/ or http://eatingwiththeecosystem.org/school-of-fish

Apr
5
Thu
8 Bells Lecture:U-boat Assault on America, by Ken Brown @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport
Apr 5 @ 12:00 pm
8 Bells Lecture:U-boat Assault on America, by Ken Brown @ Seamen's Church Institute of Newport | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

“U-boat Assault on America: The Eastern Seaboard Campaign 1942,” by Ken Brown.
The “Second Happy Time” was the informal name given to the phase of the battle of the Atlantic when German U-boats attacked both merchant and U.S. naval vessels along America’s east coast. With tankers burning and petrol rationing in New York City, the U.S. Navy seemed powerless to stop the deprivations of Hitler’s marauding U-boats.
Ken Brown seeks to explain how the United States responded to these deadly assaults and looks at the steps that the Navy Department took to train the men, harness the scientists, and make the organizational changes that were required to defeat the German threat.
Ken Brown has had a long fascination with naval history and has been conducting research on U-boats off the east coast of the United States for more than three years. He has published several articles in World at War magazine.

NO RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Apr
7
Sat
Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England at Linden Place Mansion @ Linden Place Mansion
Apr 7 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England at Linden Place Mansion @ Linden Place Mansion | Bristol | Rhode Island | United States

Colonial New England was awash in ales, beers, wines, cider and spirits. Everyone from teenage farmworkers to our founding fathers imbibed heartily and often. This cocktail culture reflected the New World’s abundance of raw materials: apples, sugar and molasses, wild berries and hops.
Get the taste and feel for Historic New England as author, Corin Hirsch, explores the origins and tastes of the favorite beverages of early Americans. Hirsch takes you back in time to learn about multiple drinks of historic New England with a tasting, lecture, and book singing on Saturday April 7th, 5:30 p.m.

Corin, author of the book Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England, has worked as a food and drinks journalist at various New England publications, including “Seven Days” in Burlington, Vt. Her writing has been published or cited on “Public Radio International,” “Serious Eats,” “the Associated Press,” and “Yankee,” as well as in various newspapers, radio stations, and podcasts.