globetrotters

Mike Centioli

3/31  Harlem Globetrotters

Why: In the mood for some basketball, minus the March Madness drama? Head to the Dunkin’ Donuts Center to see your favorite basketball team, the Harlem Globetrotters, face the newly revamped Washington Generals team — and the players won’t be dunking doughnuts! See a dazzling display of basketball wizardry (jumps, tricks, you name it) with a dash of comedy for an event that will be a slam dunk for the whole family.
Where: Dunkin’ Donuts Center, 1 LaSalle Sq., Providence.
More info: Call 331-0700 or visit dunkindonutscenter.com.

Feb
25
Sun
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Feb 25 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”

Valley Talks: Origins of the Right to Work @ Museum of Work & Culture
Feb 25 @ 1:30 pm
Valley Talks: Origins of the Right to Work @ Museum of Work & Culture | Woonsocket | Rhode Island | United States

The Museum of Work and Culture will offer the fourth installment of its free Valley Talks series on Sunday, Feb. 25, at 1:30 p.m.

Writer & professor Cedric de Leon will present “The Origins of the Right to Work,” which explores the the creation of right-to-work laws, and traces their origins to the Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War. In doing so, de Leon connects past and present, raising critical questions that address pressing social issues.

de Leon is Associate Professor of Sociology at Tufts University. He has written three books, including most recently, “The Origins of Right to Work: Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago.” In a past life, he was by turns an organizer and a local union president in the U.S. labor movement. He lives in Providence with his wife Emily, his son Ellis, and his poodle Atticus Finch.

Seating is limited to 75 and is first-come, first-served.

Dance Music Jam Sessions @ Goff Hall
Feb 25 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Dance  Music Jam Sessions @ Goff Hall | Rehoboth | Massachusetts | United States

The dance music jam sessions continue in Rehoboth every Sunday night from 7-9 p.m. All are welcome!

Once a month throughout the year, the session is a Community Dance, at which we teach everything that needs teaching, depending on the experience of the dancers. The Community Dances go from 7 to 9 p.m. and are preceded by a potluck at 6 p.m.

All Jammers dances are held on Sunday nights from 7 to 9 with a potluck at 6 p.m.

For information or to check about cancellations, call Bob Elliott at 774-644-1369 or email him at bobolinkelliott@yahoo.com.

The Sunday Night Jammers are a group of (mostly) instrumental (mostly) musicians, who play (mostly) Celtic-inspired dance music. Our music is (mostly) for couple dances, such as waltzes, hambos, polkas, and schottisches.

Now, to clear up those “mostly”s:
1) Sometimes we sing…or at least some of us sing.
2) Some of us are very serious musicians, some are duffers, many are in between. We are VERY polite about each other’s errors.
3) We started with English, Scottish, Irish, Canadian, and New England dance music, but we have gotten more international as the months go by.
4) After Scandinavian and German couple dances, a few Israeli line dances appeared, followed by some Greek and Balkan dances with “interesting” time signatures.

In brief, all of us have learned a lot, and we welcome others to come play, teach, learn, and, in general, have fun!

Feb
26
Mon
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Feb 26 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”

Finding Phebe: Uncovering the History of Slavery in Warren, Rhode Island @ East Providence Public Library / Weaver
Feb 26 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Finding Phebe: Uncovering the History of Slavery in Warren, Rhode Island @ East Providence Public Library / Weaver | East Providence | Rhode Island | United States

Although 18th century Warren, RI was surrounded by the slave centers of Newport, Bristol and Providence, its small size has made it a footnote in what has been written about slavery and the slave trade. Building on the work of historians, Patricia Mues and Sarah Weed use primary sources – including wills, inventories, town meeting records, censuses and other documents – to identify the enslaved of Warren and learn their histories. Mues and Weed are co-chairs of the Warren Middle Passage Project and board members of the Warren Preservation Society.

Feb
27
Tue
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Feb 27 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”

Thrive Cinema: The Human Experiment @ Thrive Tribe RI
Feb 27 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Thrive Cinema: The Human Experiment @ Thrive Tribe RI | East Providence | Rhode Island | United States

Connect with the tribe, watch and learn in a community based setting. A short discussion will take place after the film to share takeaways and any AHA! moments. Bring a blanket, pillow, and a friend 🙂

Friendly conversation with light refreshments.

Cost: $5

About the featured film: “The Human Experiment lifts the veil on the shocking reality that thousands of untested, unregulated chemicals are in the products we use every day, our homes, and inside each of us. Simultaneously, disease rates are rising: everything from cancer to infertility is appearing at levels doctors and researchers have never seen.”

Feb
28
Wed
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Feb 28 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”

Mar
1
Thu
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Mar 1 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”

Mar
2
Fri
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum
Mar 2 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
To Win or Lose All: William S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War @ Naval War College Museum | Newport | Rhode Island | United States

The Naval War College Museum presents a new exhibit, “To Win or Lose All: Williams S. Sims and the U.S. Navy in the First World War.” The exhibit occupies the museum’s gallery on the second floor.
To Win or Lose All explores the Navy’s role in securing victory for the Allies during the First World War. Under Admiral Sims’s leadership, American warships escorted convoys to France, laid mines in the North Sea, and hunted German submarines. On land, naval aviators flew scouting and bombing missions while Marines fought in the trenches east of Paris. While the sweeping naval campaigns of 1942-1945 may attract more scholarly attention, the foundation for their success was established twenty-five years earlier when the Navy operated for the first time as part of a coalition. Indeed, many officers who rose to prominence in the Second World War – Ernest J. King, Chester W. Nimitz, and Harold R. Stark, to name a few – gained valuable experience with combined operations during the first global conflict of the twentieth century. Curator Rob Doane hopes, “that this exhibit will encourage visitors to understand Admiral Sims and the sailors who served under him as real people who worked under difficult circumstances to meet the enormous challenges of wartime service.”