The Rhode Island Coffee Guide

These local coffee spots are changing the roasting, grinding and brewing game by bringing quality beans to the Ocean State.



Pouring it On

The do’s and don’ts of coffee-making with New Harvest Coffee Roasters. By Samantha Labrecque

Sophie Short is the lead trainer at New Harvest Coffee Roasters where she teaches coffee fundamentals to aspiring baristas. For the past year, Short has honed her coffee-making skills through New Harvest’s training department.

Choose a brewing method that is appropriate for you. Whether it’s French press or a Chemex, it should be based on what suits you and your coffee preference.
Use the correct coffee to water ratio, preferably 1:15, so that it is neither watered down nor too concentrated.
Choose the correct filter and grind texture that corresponds with the brew method.
Only grind coffee when ready to brew.
Wet the filter before pouring the grinds to avoid the paper taste from the filter.
Brew small amounts more frequently rather than a large pot that sits around.

Use unfiltered tap water because it will affect the way the brew tastes. Bottled spring water can also be used.
Reheat coffee. It will become stale and the original flavors and aromatics will no longer be prominent — almost like a burnt taste.
Leave coffee exposed to air. Properly storing it in an opaque air-tight container is the best way to maintain quality.
Freeze coffee. It doesn’t improve freshness.
New Harvest Coffee Roasters, 999 Main St. #108, Pawtucket, 438-1999; New Harvest Coffee and Spirits, 65 Weybosset St. #118, Providence, 272-4604,

Local Buzz: Tiverton’s Coastal Roasters was born in 1999 with a stovetop popcorn maker in a kitchen in Alexandria, Virginia. Donald Machado bought green coffee beans and taught
himself home roasting, and when he and his wife moved up to Rhode Island, they took over a former surf shop in Tiverton in 2002, and began selling their beans. Fifteen years later the shop serves more than 400
customers a day.

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