Fact, Fiction or Fickle: Beauty Myths

We ask local beauty experts if these myths are fact, fiction or fickle.

This week, we tackle myths surrounding beauty. Check back next week when we bust fitness myths.

BEAUTY

Experts: Mary Ellen Disanto, Registered Dietitian

and

Jessica Storti, Hair Care Specialist

Myth: Certain nuts are good for your skin.

F A C T

Walnuts are high in omega-3, which can help delay wrinkles and fight the effects of stress on the skin. They also have the ability to help lighten dark circles that appear after sleepless nights, and they can help your skin naturally glow — so no pricey highlighters needed!

Myth: Certain foods or vitamins can help with hair and nail growth.

F A C T

If you’re dreaming of long locks or trading your acrylics in for natural nails, biotin (or vitamin B7) is excellent for hair and nail growth. A few good sources include almonds, eggs, tomatoes and cauliflower.

Myth: Coconut oil makes your hair shinier.

F A C T

 Try putting the oil in for roughly thirty minutes and then shampoo and condition
as normal — this should help increase your natural shine.

Myth: Lemon juice can lighten your hair.

F A C T

Yes, the heat radiated from the sun opens your hair cuticles while the lemon acts as a lift, causing the color to become blonder.

 

 

Myth: You should wash your hair every day.

FICTION

Washing your hair daily makes your hair become greasier because you are basically stripping your scalp of its natural oils. That causes your glands to produce more sebum to make up for the lost oil. Washing your hair every day also can cause it to become dry, causing dandruff depending on the type of follicles you have.

Leave a reply